AAP 2015 Program

Association for Asian Performance 15th Annual Conference
Montréal, Québec, Canada
July 29-30, 2015
Bienvenus au Canada ! The Association for Asian Performance pre-conference takes place immediately prior to the ATHE conference, at the same venue and includes our annual Schmooze-fest! Come join us for a great time in French Canada!

Download the Schedule

SCHEDULE
Wednesday, July 29th
7:30-8:00am
Coffee and Registration

8:00 – 8:15am
Welcome from the President

8:25-9:35am
Panel I: Asian Theatre Outside of Asia (Rm 1)
Chair: Colleen Lanki, University of Fraser Valley/ TomoeArts

“Tables Turned: Networks Saved Kue Hing Theatre Company in 1923”
— Rui Zhang, University of British Columbia

“Behind the Butoh: Ohno-inspired pedagogy in Vancouver, BC”
— Eury Colin Chang, University of British Columbia

“Theatre of Nations: Resituating East Asian Traditional Theatre within World Theatre”
— Hyo Jeong Hong, University of Minnesota

Roundtable I: Asian Theatre in Public Schools and in the Community – Strategies and Challenges (Rm 2)
Roundtable Organizer:
Kirstin Pauka, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Participants:
David Jortner, Baylor University
Yoshiko Fukushima, University of Hawaii at Hilo
Elizabeth Wichmann-Walczak, University of Hawaii at Manoa

9:35-9:50am
Break

9:50-11:00am
Panel II: Contemporary Conflicts in Traditional Asian Puppetry (Rm 1)
Chair: Bethany J. Collier, Bucknell University

“Reframing Traditional String Puppetry for Bangalore’s Urban Audiences”
— Claudia Orenstein, Hunter College and the Graduate Center at CUNY

“Race and Religion in Malaysian Puppetry”
— William Condee, Ohio University

“Sema Thai Marionette Theatre: Manipulating Tradition in Thailand”
— Jennifer Goodlander, Indiana University

Respondent:
Annie Rollins, Concordia University

Panel III: Techniques and Technologies: Constructing Authority and Gender in the 1950s PRC Performance (Rm 3)
Chair: Tarryn Li-Min Chun, Harvard University

“Smokestacks and Stages: Socialist Theater Construction in the PRC, 1949-1959”
— Tarryn Li-Min Chun, Harvard University

“The Politics of Professional Performance: Shanxi Drama Troupes in the 1950s”
— Brian DeMare, Tulane University

“(Un)Conventional Feminism: Maoist Heroines and the Embodiment of Gendered Agency in the Great Leap Forward Dance Dramas”
— Emily Wilcox, University of Michigan

“Proletarian Magicians: Gender and Magic Shows in 1950s PRC”
— Tracy Zhang, University of Montreal

11:00-12:10pm
Panel IV: Politics and Theatre in China and Beyond (Rm 1)
Chair: Siyuan Liu, University of British Columbia

“Theatre Made Revolutionary: The Student Theatre and the Youth Culture in Colonial-Modern China”
— Yizhou Huang, Tufts University

“Cantonese Opera in New York City and Its Impact on the Representations of Chinese Characters on the American Stage”
— Esther Kim Lee, University of Maryland

“Standardization of Guan Yu’s Image on Jingju Stage: An Apotheosis Campaign Between State and Theatre”
— Qiu Yanting, University of British Columbia

Panel V: Touring Performers and Tourist Spectators: International Audiences for Japanese Performance (Room 2)
Chair: Christopher J. Mitchell, Eastern Illinois University

“Strange Yet Again: Kawakami Otojiro and the Prsentation of ‘Authentic’ Japanese Theatre in America”
— Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr., Loyola Marymount University

“Seeming Japanese: Ito Michio in Mexico” — Tara Rodman, Northwestern University

“Puppetry on Art Island: Local Traditions and International Audiences” — Iyana S. Browne, University of Washington

12:10-1:30pm
Lunch – On Your Own

Brown Bag Session for Grad Students (Rm 1)
“Securing the First Teaching Position as an Asian Performance Specialist”
— Session Organizer: Xing Fan, University of Toronto
— Panelists: Emily Wilcox, University of Michigan and Jennifer Goodlander, Indiana University

1:30-2:40pm
Panel VI: Emerging Scholars Adjudicated Panel (Rm 1)
We are pleased to welcome these emerging scholars to AAP
Chair: Iris Hsin-chun Tuan, National Chiao Tung University

“A Korean Classic on the Chinese Stage: Theatrical Diplomacy and Artistic Innovation in Tale of Chunxiang”
— Anne Rebull, University of Chicago

“Chinese Shadow Puppetry’s Changing Apprentice System: Questions of Continuance and a Survey of Remaining Shadow Puppet’s Practitioners in Mainland China 2008-2013”
–Annie Rollins, Concordia University

“Exploring Intertextuality in Brecht’s Good Person of Szechwan: Two Appropriations of Chinese Xiqu Twelve Years Apart”
Wei Zhang, University of Hawaii at Manoa

2:40-3:50pm
Workshop I: Koshi Fan Footy: A Workshop Based on the Tenets of Japanese Traditional Movement Forms with Applications for Contemporary Theatre – Part One (Rm 2)
(Participants may take one or both sessions)
Workshop Leaders: John Oglevee, University of Hawaii at Manoa and Colleen Lanki, University of Fraser Valley/ TomoeArts

Noh and kabuki (kabuki dance) are two of Japan’s best known dance theatre forms. Noh itself is an amalgam of centuries old dances both imported and adapted. The movement and gesture of kabuki theatre is entirely based in dance kata (forms). They both have at their core the idea of movement being initiated in the koshi (center). The term koshi wo ireru – literally “putting in the hips” means to ground the body and use the hip area as the location for movement.

This workshop takes part in two sessions. This, the first session, is based in the movement of noh and looking at kamae (basic stance), suriashi (sliding feet), and jo ha kyu (concept of pacing). After getting a feel for the classical, we will look at how to adapt these notions to contemporary movement theatre. Through the use of jo ha kyu, the simple act of reading a newspaper becomes a nuanced story

3:50-4:05pm
Coffee Break

4:05-5:30pm
Panel VII: Negotiating Tradition(s) (Rm 1)
Chair: Whit Emerson, Indiana University

“Teenagers, Technology, Tradition: Managing Identity in Balinese Arja”
— Bethany J. Collier, Bucknell University

“Re-valuing Heritage: UNESCO’s List of Masterpieces and Dialogues between Tradition and Innovation in Contemporary Kunqu”
— Alex Gomar, Shanghai Theatre Academy

“Contested Memories: Repurposed Histories in Contemporary Vietnamese Classical Opera in Vietnam and the Diaspora”
— Kim Nguyen Tran, University of California, Los Angeles

Panel VIII: Japanese Theatre Challenging Context and Tradition (Room 2)
Chair: David Jortner, Baylor University

“Human Art Center Iida Shigemi’s Transformation from e-dance to Mikusa no Mitakara” — Yoshiko Fukushima, University of Hawaii at Hilo

“Turning Point: Compassion in Japanese Cinema”
— Linda C. Ehrlich, Case Western Reserve University

“Ninagawa’s Hamlet in Taiwan: Intercultural Representation” — Iris Hsin-chun Tuan, National Chiao Tung University

5:30-6:40pm
Panel IX: Founding Mothers in Asian Theatre Studies
Chair: Kathy Foley, University of California, Santa Cruz

“Betty Bernhard”
— Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei, University of California, Los Angeles

“Judy Mitoma”
— Kathy Foley, University of California, Santa Cruz

“Rachel Cooper”
–Cobina Gillitt, Purchase College, SUNY

6:45
Schmoozefest Gathering
KanBai: 1813 Rue Ste-Catharine O
About 20 minutes to walk
Join is for dinner and conversation!

9:15pm
Grad Student Get Together!!!
at Les Voyageurs Bar
in Fairmont, the Queen Elizabeth Hotel
Hosts:
Jennifer Goodlander, Indiana University
Emily Wilcox, University of Michigan

Thursday July 30th
8:00-9:15:

Workshop II: Koshi Fan Footy: A Workshop Based on the Tenets of Japanese Traditional Movement Forms with Applications for Contemporary Theatre – Part Two (Rm 1)
(Participants may take one or both sessions)
Workshop Leaders: John Oglevee, University of Hawaii at Manoa and Colleen Lanki, University of Fraser Valley/ TomoeArts

Noh and kabuki (kabuki dance) are two of Japan’s best known dance theatre forms. Noh itself is an amalgam of centuries old dances both imported and adapted. The movement and gesture of kabuki theatre is entirely based in dance kata (forms). They both have at their core the idea of movement being initiated in the koshi (center). The term koshi wo ireru – literally “putting in the hips” means to ground the body and use the hip area as the location for movement.

This session will focus on kabuki odori. building on the ideas of the first session, with a continuing look at koshi, gait and gesture, the second session will also examine the basic movements that create a character. Character in kabuki odori is created through the angles and kinesphere of the limbs in space, and through textures in gait and gesture. This second half will teach these principles for basic male and female characters, then participants will experiment with ways to use these signifiers to create modern characters.

Board Meeting (Rm 2)

9:15-10:25
Panel X: Difficult Memories: Radical Practices of Longing in Contemporary Asian Performance (Rm 1)
Chair: Kirstin Pauka, University of Hawaii at Manoa

“Life Stories of Delicious Violence: The Use of Memory in Kishida Rio’s Thread to Hell”
— Colleen Lanki, University of Fraser Valley/ TomoeArts

“On the Edge with Lin Zhaohua’s Provacative Hamlet in Beijing: ‘Though this be madness, yet there is method in ‘t’”
— Bettina Entell, University of Hawaii at Manoa/ Show and Tell Films

“Radical Re-memory: Butoh Women in Pain”
— Katherine Mezur, San Francisco Museum of Performance and Design

“Memory of the Shadow: Collective Body Memory and Significant Cultural Shift in the Butoh Work of Hijikata Tatsumi and Ohno Kazuo”
— Kathryn Moller, Fort Lewis College

“’What’s the point? We’re all dead anyway…’: The Sarin Subway Attack, Sakate Yoji’s ‘Yaneura’ and J-Horror”
— Kevin Wetmore, Loyola Marymount University

Panel XI: Writing/Creating Modern Theatre (Rm 2)
Chair: David Mason, Rhodes College

“Intercultural Theatre Groups of Japan and the History of International Performance Collaboration in Tokyo”
— Jon Reimer, UCSD/UC-Irvine Joint PhD Program

Scholar and Executioner: Translating a Modern View on the Late Qing”
— Whit Emerson, Indiana University

“Indian Women Playwrights Speak Out”
— Shirley Huston-Findley, The College of Wooster

10:25-10:40
Break

10:40-11:50
Roundtable II: Defining the Field: What is Asian Theatre? (Rm 1)
Roundtable Organizer:
Jennifer Goodlander, Indiana University

Participants:
Deidre Onishi, Cameron University
John Oglevee, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Cobina Gillitt, Purchase College, SUNY
Jon Reimer, University of California, San Diego
Matthew Kelty, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Ji Hyon (Kayla) Yuh, CUNY Graduate Center

What is Asian theatre? Who makes Asian performance? Where does Asian theatre take place??? What kind of performances and art works are considered Asian performance?

In response to several issues raised by the submissions to the 2015 conference – and some of my own questions prompted by my research and teaching… This round table seeks to define and question the field of Asian performance.

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

——-

AAP PANELS AT ATHE

Thursday, July 30th
1:30 – 3:00 pm

Asian Theatre Journal Lecture
“Anthologizing Modern Japanese Drama”
M. Cody Poulton, University of Victoria

AAP and ATJ are pleased to honor this distinguished scholar, who was originally scheduled for last year but who needed to reschedule for personal reasons. In this invitational lecture, Professor Poulton will discuss the making of two of his recent books: A Beggar’s Art and The Columbia Anthology of Modern Japanese Literature.

M. Cody Poulton is Professor of Japanese literature and theatre in the Department of Pacific and Asian Studies at the University of Victoria, Canada, where he has taught since 1988. A specialist in modern Japanese theatre, he has also been active as a translator of Japanese fiction and drama, including three kabuki plays for Volumes I and II of Kabuki Plays on Stage, edited by James Brandon and Samuel L. Leiter (2000, 2001) and several contemporary works for the ten-volume Half A Century of Modern Japanese Theater series (1999-2008). He is author of Spirits of Another Sort: The Plays of Izumi Kyōka (2001) and A Beggar’s Art: Scripting Modernity in Japan, 1900-1930 (2010), co- editor, with Mitsuya Mori and J. Thomas Rimer, of The Columbia Anthology of Modern Japanese Drama (2014), and contributing editor to The Cambridge History of Japanese Theatre (forthcoming).

3:15 -4:45pm
Performing Asian Bodies: Festivals and Theatre in France, Britain, and China
Coordinator/Chair: Alexa Huang, George Washington University

“Performing Asia in Britain: The Politics of Festivals and Touring Theatre”

— Alexa Huang, George Washington University

“A Chinese Giant’s Global Journey”

— Liana Chen (George Washington University)

“The Journey of Tian Axi: A Survey of His Chinese Performances in the Nineteenth Century France”
— Shih-Lung Lo, Reseau Asie et Pacifique, CNRS, France

“Wuzhen Theatre Festival—the Theatrical and Tourist Spectacles Open to Glocal Gaze?”
— Jiayun Zhuang, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Friday, July 31st
8:30-10:00am
Gender in Ever-Changing Theatres Coordinator/Chair: Xing Fan, University of Toronto

“Gender, Ritual, and Mimesis at Amateur Ramlilas”
— Pamela Lothspeich, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

“Clytemnestra as Conceived by Richard Schechner in Taiwan and Tadashi Suzuki in Japan”
— Yi-Ping Wu, The Ohio State University

“Gender in Korean Traditional Puppetry”
— Kyounghye Kwon, University of North Georgia

12:00-1:30pm
AAP Membership meeting

All current and potential members are urged to attend. Help determine the future of our organization!

4:00-5:30pm
Memory as Method: The Uses and Misuses of Memory-based Sources in (Asian) Performance History
Co-sponsored by Theatre History and the Association for Asian Performance Coordinator/Chair: Emily Wilcox, University of Michigan

“Who Do You Trust? The Limitations of Memory-Based Scholarship”
— Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei, University of California, Los Angeles

“Diaries, Memoirs, and Biographies: The Issue of Memory and Ideology in China’s Post-1949 Dramatic Reform”
— Siyuan Liu, University of British Columbia

“When the Archive Fails: Memories as a Strategy for Writing Suppressed Performance Histories”
— Emily Wilcox, University of Michigan

5:45-7:15pm
Re-Examining Official Narratives of Jingju (Beijing Opera) Iconography and Reform
Coordinator: Siyuan Liu, University of British Columbia Chair: David Rolston, University of Michigan

“‘Still Under Our Control’: The State Ownership of Jingju’s Last Major Private Companies”
— Siyuan Liu, University of British Columbia

“Born at the ‘Sacred Headquarters of Revolution’: Reexamining the Yan’an Pingju Academy and Its Repertory”
— Xing Fan, University of Toronto

“Mei Lanfang and ‘Metaphoric Imagery’”

— Elizabeth Wichmann-Walczak, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Saturday, August 1st

8:15-9:45am
“This is How It All Went Down”: Remembering and Questioning the Inception of Modern Musical Theatre in (Post)Colonial Asias
Co-sponsored by Association for Asian Performance and Music Theatre/Dance Coordinator/Chair: Sissi Liu, City University of New York

“Remembering Li Jinhui: Gewuju and the Formidable Birth of the Modern Chinese Musical Theatre”
— Sissi Liu, City University of New York

“Pardon Me, I was There”: Recording, Recounting, and Remembering the Beginnings of Korean Musical Theatre”
— Ji-Hyon (Kayla) Yuh, City university of New York

“Beyond Beauty World: The Singaporean Quest for Identity through Musical Theatre”
— Caleb Goh, Edith Cowan University

2:15-3:45pm
Vectors of Remembering: Engaging Possibilities for Emerging Sites and Methods of Research at the Intersections of Asian Performance and Performance Studies (Roundtable Discussion)
Co-sponsored by the Performance Studies Focus Group and Association for Asian Performance
Coordinator: Melissa Wansin Wong, City University of New York
Chair: Peter Eckersall, City University of New York

Participants:
— Michelle Liu-Carriger, University of California, Los Angeles — Sean Metzger, University of California, Los Angeles
— Pavitha Prasad, University of Denver
— Ugoran Prasad, City University of New York
— Eng-Beng Lim, Dartmouth College
— Elizabeth Son, Northwestern University
— Katherine Mezur, Independent Scholar

5:45-7:15pm
Memoirs and the Showa Crucible: Performer’s Remembrances and/of mid-20th Century Japan
Coordinator/Chair: John Swain, Independent Scholar
Discussant: Cody Poulton, University of Victoria

“Makishi Koshu: Acting to Remember Ryukyu”
— John Swain, Independent Scholar

“Recalled, Forgotten, Remembered: Omoidasu, Wasuremasu, and Oboeru in 1960s Angura Theatre”
–David Jortner, Baylor University

“Hijikata Yoshi and Post-shingeki: Modern Japanese Theatre through the Lens of Memoirs”
— Guohe Zheng, Ball State University

7:20-8:50pm
Middle Eastern and Middle-Eastern- American Theatre and Performance
Coordinators/Chairs: James Al-Shamma, Belmont University and Fatima Madani, Arizona State University

“The Birth of Modern Iraqi Theatre: Church Drama in Mosul in the Late Nineteenth Century”
— James Al-Shamma, Belmont University

“Remembering Mourning Mothers of Iran”

— Fatima Madani, Arizona State University

“War on the Iranian Stage: Theatricalization of Enshrined and Condemned Memories”
— Marjan Moosavi, University of Toronto

“Woza Palestine: Palestinian Performances of South African Protest Plays”

— Gibson Alessandro Cima, Tufts University and Samer Al-Saber, Davidson College

“Tabouli Tours: Memory and Forgetting in the Lebanese American Stage Comedy Um Hussein”
— Kate C. Wilson, City University of New York

Sunday, August 2nd
11:30am-1:00pm
Staging the Past, the Present, and the Future: Theatre as Cultural Memories
Coordinator/Chair: Xing Fan, University of Toronto

“Staging the World for the Nation: Theatre of Early Korean Immigrants in California with Global Outlooks in the 1910s”
— Youngji Jeon, University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign

“Jingju Wreaking Havoc in Heaven and the Discrepancy in Transnational Cultural Memories”
— Sissi Liu, City University of New York

“Ecological Flashback: The Memory Spaces as Nostalgic Ethnography in Nick Yu’s Fisherman (2013)”
— Kaijun Chen, Columbia University

“Taiwan Silhouetted—Social Movement and Its Theatrical Double”

— Wei-Chih Wang, Penn State University